Gardening Daily Tips No 139

Welcome to nghelamvuon.wordpress.com Gardening Daily Tips No 139

Heather, Scotch (Calluna vulgaris)

Plant type: Shrub

USDA Hardiness Zones: 4b to 7b

Height: 9″ to 24″

Spread: 11″ to 24″

Exposure: partial shade partial sun to full sun

Bloom Color: Pink, Purple, Red

Bloom Time: Early fall, Late summer, Mid summer

Leaf Color: Green

Growth Rate: average

Moisture: moist

Soil Condition: Acidic, Sandy, Well drained

Form: Rounded, Spreading or horizontal, Upright or erect

Landscape Uses:

Alpine garden, Border, Foundation, Ground cover, Massing, Rock garden, Specimen

Special Features:

Attractive foliage, Not North American native, Suitable for cut flowers, Suitable for dried flowers, Attractive flowers or blooms

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Q&A: Causes for Uneven Tomato Ripening

Question: My large tomatoes turn red, but the flesh inside is white and hard; no other problems otherwise. The plants are green and healthy. The cherry tomatoes grown next to them are ripe and perfect. How can I grow red ripe big tomatoes again? Help! I’m lost here!

Answer: This sounds like a physiological disorder (not caused by insects or disease) known, appropriately enough, as internal white tissue. The affected tomatoes rarely show any external symptoms, but when they are cut open, hard, white areas are present inside the fruits. It is thought that high temperatures as the tomatoes are ripening is what triggers this disorder. Making sure that your soil has sufficient potassium (the “K” of the N-P-K analysis on a fertilizer label) will help to reduce the problem. Some tomato varieties seem to be more prone to this problem than others, so you may try growing a different variety next year. Another possibility is the result of insect damage. Whiteflies feeding on the tomatoes inject a toxin that causes them to ripen irregularly. Sometimes you’ll see white or yellow areas on the outside of the fruits, but sometimes all you find is hard, white tissue inside. The whiteflies that cause this damage are most prevalent in the southern parts of the country. Check for whiteflies by looking for small, white winged insects that feed on the underside of the leaves and that flutter up in a cloud when disturbed. Control them with sprays of insecticidal soap.

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Q&A: Mulching Garden

Question: I’m thinking of mulching everything in my vegetable garden with hay or straw. Is this type of mulch acceptable and is there any down side to it?

Answer: Hay can have weed (grass) seeds in it, so it can cause problems. Straw, on the other hand, is usually free of seeds. In my garden, I lay down several (about 10) layers of newspapers in the paths, then top them with “flakes” of hay. You can often separate bales of hay into layers that fit nicely into a garden path. This method helps control weeds, and keeps any seeds from the hay from reaching the soil. The downside of mulching is that it can keep the soil from warming up in the spring. So wait until the soil is nice and warm — a few weeks after your last frost date — before applying the mulch. Mulch can also harbor slugs and other critters.

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Q&A: Moving Bearded Iris

Question: I am moving at the end of June and would like to move some of my 40-year-old bearded irises with me. When is the best time to move them? Can I move them in June?

Answer: Traditionally, bearded iris are moved or divided about a month after they bloom, though they can be successfully moved at other times as well. Prepare the new bed thoroughly before planting to provide a rich soil with good drainage. Make sure the new transplants get plenty of water, especially during their first summer, and keep the beds well weeded.

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Tip: Control Slugs and Snails

Slugs and snails are a menace now. The evenings are warmer and it’s not cold enough to keep them home at night. They are out and about, eating their way through your garden. Keep garden beds clean and raked up to eliminate hiding places. Surround new plantings with diatomaceous earth, egg shells or fireplace ashes and renew frequently. Slugs and snails don’t like to feel a rough texture of these materials on their sensitive foot. Surround garden beds with strips of copper foil. Copper reacts with the body juices of slugs and snails causing an electrical charge that gives these garden devourers an unpleasant jolt. Set beer traps near the surface of the soil. Slugs are real boozers and will help themselves to a fatal sip if available. Pay kids a penny a piece for snails collected from your garden.

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Tip: Check Climbing Vines

Check annual and perennial vines to make sure they’re climbing their trellises properly. Some types of vines cling, some twine, some attach themselves with sticky pads, and some must be tied to their supports.

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Gardening Tips Video:

おいしい苺ができるまで How to grow delicious strawberries

Uploaded by on Apr 5, 2010

香川県三木町の女峰いちご生産者グループです。

http://www.kokorogroup-miki.com

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Education

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License:

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Vietnam Travel

Vietnam – The Hidden Charm

Uploaded by on Jun 7, 2009

Discover Vietnam, the Hidden Charm with this video brought to you by Travel index and the Travel and Tourism Foundation. Visit us at:

http://www.travelindex.com
http://www.tourismfoundation.org
http://www.destinationvietnam.org

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Gardening Daily Tips No 138

Welcome to nghelamvuon.wordpress.com Gardening Daily Tips No 138

Pear, Callery (Pyrus calleryana)

Plant type: Tree

USDA Hardiness Zones: 5a to 9a

Height: 300″ to 479″

Spread: 300″ to 420″

Exposure: full sun

Bloom Color: White

Bloom Time: Early spring, Late spring, Mid spring

Leaf Color: Green

Growth Rate: fast

Moisture: moist

Soil Condition: Acidic, Alkaline, Clay, Loamy, Neutral, Sandy, Slightly alkaline, Well drained

Form: Pyramidal, Rounded

Landscape Uses:

Espalier, Firewood, Screen, Specimen, Street tree

Special Features:

Not North American native, Naturalizing, Blooms are very showy

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Q&A: Blackberry Fungus

Question: The undersides of the leaves of my blackberries are covered with a bright orange coating. What’s going on?

Answer: Your blackberries are infected with a fungus disease called orange rust. It causes the leaves of the plant to turn yellowish and misshapen, the canes to turn scaly and the leaf undersides to become covered with blistered pustules that release vivid orange, dust-like spores. This disease mainly affects blackberries and is most often a problem in the eastern U.S. Sometimes it affects black and purple raspberries, but it doesn’t bother red raspberries. Once an infection starts, the disease spreads throughout the plant. Unfortunately, there is no effective treatment for the disease and infected plants never recover to flower and fruit. To prevent problems, plant only certified disease-free plants. Prune out and destroy the fruiting canes as soon as they are harvested and keep the entire patch thinned for good air circulation. As soon as you notice infected plants, pull them out and destroy them so they can’t send their spores on the wind to infect new plants. If possible, remove any wild blackberries and black raspberries growing nearby that could harbor the disease.

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Q&A: Promoting Longer Bloom Period

Question: How do I get black-eyed Susans and tall phlox to bloom longer? Does trimming the plant help?

Answer: Black-eyed Susans will bloom naturally over a long period, but if you deadhead the plants by cutting them back by about half once the main flush begins to fade, you may stimulate another (smaller) flush of bloom in the fall. Some gardeners simply allow the seedheads to remain and consider them an attractive fall and winter feature in and of themselves, and the birds will enjoy the seeds. The plants would then be trimmed back very short in the spring. Tall phlox will bloom over a longer period if spent flowers are removed one by one. In general, phlox (except creeping phlox) should be trimmed off very short in the fall once frost has browned the tops. All of these plants will give their best display in full sun with rich soil that is kept evenly moist (but not soggy).

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Q&A: Cats in the Vegetable Garden

Question: I have several large outdoor planters which are used for growing vegetables. My cats insist on using them as litter boxes. Is there any health hazard in eating the vegetables from these plants?

Answer: Cats do carry an oganism that causes toxoplasmosis. This microorganism (Toxoplasma gondii) is spread to the soil through their feces and it is transferable to humans. Pregnant women, children, those with compromised immune systems, and the elderly are particularly susceptible, pregnant women being at highest risk. You can have your cats checked for toxoplasmosis, but even if they are free from it, it doesn’t mean the other cats in your neigborhood are. Also, all mammal feces contain E. coli, which can cause illness as well. Usually, you can discourage cats with a thick layer of mulch (try several pages of newsprint topped with straw). You can also try commercial repellents — your veterinarian can make some recommendations. Best of luck!

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Tip: Pinch Herbs for Fullness

Pinching (removing the growing tip of each branch) of your herbs will keep plants compact. By doing so you are providing yourself with succulent new growth which is ideal for harvesting. Always use the new leaves for cooking. Older foliage has a bitter flavor and a tough texture.

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Tip: Prop Up Fruit Tree Branches

If the branches on pear, citrus, or plum trees begin to bend under the weight of a heavy fruit crop, prop them up or consider thinning some of the fruit to lighten the load.

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Gardening Tips Video:

KRONE BIG X PRODUCT VIDEO 1-2

Uploaded by on Aug 21, 2010

presentazione dell gamma big x

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Overnight Trip Halong Bay


Gardening Daily Tips No 137

Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius)

Plant type: Shrub

USDA Hardiness Zones: 2a to 7a

Height: 59″ to 79″

Spread: 72″ to 120″

Exposure: full sun

Bloom Color: White

Bloom Time: Early summer, Late spring, Mid summer

Leaf Color: Purple

Growth Rate: average

Moisture: moist

Soil Condition: Acidic, Loamy, Neutral, Sandy, Slightly alkaline, Well drained

Form: Oval

Landscape Uses:

Border, Foundation, Massing, Specimen

Special Features:

Attractive foliage, North American native, Blooms are very showy

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Q&A: Need suggestions for seashore garden

Question: I am looking to plant one large tree, some grasses, some blooming perennials. What will do good at the seashore? What evergreens do well in sandy soil conditions?

Answer: Ornamental grass are great choices for the shore. They rustle in the wind and seem happy in sandy soil. Annuals and perennials prefer more soil substance so to ensure the success and longevity of your plants, first amended soil with 6 or more inches of organic matter such as compost, old rotted leaves, or aged manure mixed with straw. Each year, add more organic matter and mulch the plantings well. A drip irrigation system will help the plants get well established. Here are some annuals to consider for full sun: marigolds, zinnias, nicotiana, tithonia, salvia, nierembergia, cleome, morning glories, ornamental sweet potato vines, and other annual vines (except sweet peas), cosmos, geraniums, and amaranthus. For shady areas, try the impatiens, coleus, and caladiums. Perennials to consider would be salvia, dianthus “Bath’s Pink”, gladiolus, dahlia, purple fountain grass, purple cone flower, liatris, perovskia, coreopsis, daylilies (hemerocallis), lavender, ornamental grasses, sedums, and perennial geraniums. Trees to consider include hemlock, blue spruce, pin oak and scarlet oak. I hope this gives you some ideas.

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Q&A: Rabbit Control

Question: How can I control the rabbits in the garden that eat on all the vegetables? I’ve tried moth balls to no avail.

Answer: Moth balls don’t really deter hungry rabbits. About the only long-term solution is to fence your garden with chicken wire, burying it a good 12 inches into the soil. You can make hoop frames out of PVC pipe and drape the wire over, attaching it to the hoops. When you bury the ends, make an “L” shape with the end pointing away from the garden. This method makes weeding difficult so be sure to mulch your bed with 3-4 inches of organic matter to help suppress weeds. Better luck with your garden this season!

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Q&A: Deadheading Flowers

Question: an you explain what deadheading is, and how to do it? I have petunias, daylillies and carnations. Do I just pull the flower off or cut the stem? If I cut the stem, how far down?

Answer: Deadheading simply means removing spent blooms. The main reasons for deadheading are to prevent seed formation and thereby conserve the plant’s energy, and also to make the plants look tidier in the garden. Some perennials and most annual flowers will have extended bloom periods if you are diligent about removing blossoms before they go to seed. For petunias, pinch or snip off the flower, cutting back to just above a set of leaves. Don’t just remove the petals–you need to remove the developing seed pod too. If you deadhead petunias regularly, they will continue to bloom right up until frost. Daylilies can be deadheaded either daily by removing the individual spent flowers, or you may wait until all the buds on that scape have opened and then remove the scape at the base. On carnations, cut the whole wiry stem off at the base (leaving the basal foliage) or, if you want to try to encourage rebloom, cut the stem just above a leaf. (The tendency to rebloom depends to some extent on what type you are growing.) Good luck!

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Tip: Protect New Seedlings

Use plastic baskets from cherry tomatoes or strawberries to protect newly-sprouted seedlings such as corn, cucumber, melons and squash from birds. By the time that the seedlings have grown tall enough to reach through the tops of the baskets, they are no longer as tender and succulent as the birds prefer.

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Tip: Keep Containers Hydrated

When watering plants in containers, moisten the entire root ball. If the soil dries out and shrinks from the sides of the pot, plunge the entire container into a bucket of warm water for an hour or until the soil re-hydrates.

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Gardening Tips Video:

Hot Pepper Harvest in Oklahoma – Dec 2009

Uploaded by on Dec 28, 2010

We visit with two Oklahoma farmers about producing hot peppers in western Oklahoma.

Category:

Nonprofits & Activism

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License:

Standard YouTube License

Vietnam Travel

Ha Long Bay, Cat Ba Island, Vietnam Travel Video Guide

Uploaded by on Nov 3, 2010

Heritage listed Ha Long Bay is a major tourist attraction in Vietnam, and rightly so. The bay is home to over a thousand jungle clad limestone pillars, several of which are hollow and contain enormous caves. I next visit Cat Ba Island, the largest island in the bay. Half of Cat ba is National Park. I interview Tuan, a local cafe owner. He takes me for a tour of the island and we also visit a floating village, where people farm fish in small enclosures.

Vịnh Hạ Long, đảo Cát Bà, Du lịch Việt Nam Video Hướng dẫn

Di sản được liệt kê Vịnh Hạ Long là một điểm thu hút du lịch lớn ở Việt Nam, và đúng như vậy. Bay là hơn một ngàn trụ cột rừng đá vôi phủ, một số trong đó đều trống rỗng và chứa các hang động khổng lồ. Tôi tới thăm đảo Cát Bà, hòn đảo lớn nhất trong vịnh. Một nửa của ba Cát là Vườn quốc gia. Tôi phỏng vấn Tuấn, một chủ quán cà phê địa phương. Ông đưa cho tôi một tour du lịch của hòn đảo và chúng tôi cũng ghé thăm một ngôi làng nổi, nơi mọi người có trang trại nuôi cá trong các thùng nhỏ.

Translation – Vu Khac Hao http://www.tamchandoor.com/ with help from Thư Minh Triệu and Nguyen Bich Thuy. Any traditional Vietnamese loops Discovery Sound http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFXNmsXOJNk


Gardening Daily Tips No 136

Welcome to nghelamvuon.wordpress.com Gardening Daily Tips No 136

Witchhazel, Vernal (Hamamelis vernalis)

Plant type: Shrub

USDA Hardiness Zones: 4b to 8b

Height: 72″ to 120″

Spread: 72″ to 120″

Exposure: shade to full sun

Bloom Color: Red, Yellow

Bloom Time: Early winter, Late winter, Mid winter

Leaf Color: Green

Growth Rate: slow

Moisture: moist

Soil Condition: Acidic, Alkaline, Clay, Loamy, Neutral, Sandy, Well drained

Form: Rounded

Landscape Uses:

Specimen, Woodland garden

Special Features:

North American native, Fragrant flowers, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms

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Q&A: Alyssum

Question: I recently planted Alyssum in my garden. How do I prune it when the blossoms have faded? When should I fertilize it and how frequently? What kind of fertilizer should I use?

Answer: You can simply shear the faded flowers off, cutting the entire plant to the same level. I use scissors to cut my alyssum back. You can feed with a half strength dilution of a water soluable fertilizer (such as Miracle Gro) every 3-4 weeks during the growing season. Enjoy your new plant!

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Q&A: Planting Calla Lilies

Question: I would like to plant calla lilies in the front of my house along the porch. This area receives much sun during the day. Is this a good place for them and what type of care do I need to give them?

Answer: Calla lilies are native to South Africa so while they’ll provide lovely summer color in your garden, they won’t tolerate your cold winter weather. Callas thrive in a partly sunny bed (shaded from hot afternoon sun), in rich, moist soil. Prepare the soil by incorporating lots of compost or other organic matter that will help hold moisture. Plant the rhizomes 4″-6″ deep, 1′-2′ apart, in rich, moist soil. In late summer, after flowering is finished, dry them out gradually until the foliage dies back. Then dig and store in dry soil or sawdust, keeping them at 40F -50F degrees. In the spring, after new growth begins, replant outdoors in a prepared bed.

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Q&A: Shearing Sweet William

Question: I planted some Sweet William last year, and they bloomed beautifully this year. The flowers are now starting to die(after several weeks in full bloom). What should I do now? Should I shear them back? Is there any way to get the plants to flower again?

Answer: Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William) is a vigorous biennial providing dense clusters of flowers on tall stems. Sown from seed in late spring, they will bloom the following year. Once they’ve flowered, they won’t flower again. You can shear back the spent blooms and stems to keep the plants looking attractive, or you can leave them alone, allowing the flowers to produce seed and deposit them in the bed. This self-sowing habit will perpetuate your Sweet Williams, so you’ll have plants of flowering age each year.

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Tip: Attract Hawks and Owls

Everyone knows you can attract insect-eating birds by planting seed-producing flowers, such as coneflowers, and berry-bearing shrubs, such as mahonia. You can also lure rabbit and rodent-eating birds, such as hawks and owls, by providing them with a place to perch. T-shaped posts, at least 10 feet tall and 100 feet apart, will do the trick.

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Tip: Plan Walkways Based on Foot Traffic

Observe areas in your lawn where foot traffic has left worn areas, and rather than struggling to get grass to grow there, use the traffic patterns to plan series of paths using flagstone or pavers.

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Gardening Tips Video:

Hales Farms – Watermelons

Uploaded by on Feb 13, 2009

Will Hales grows Mardelicious watermelons on the eastern shore of Maryland. For more information visit marylandsbest.com . Slide show by Edwin Remsberg – http://www.remsberg.com

Category:

Science & Technology

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License:

Standard YouTube License

Vietnam Travel

Hội An, Vietnam Travel Video Guide

Uploaded by on Oct 21, 2010

Hội An was the most important trading port in South East Asia in the 16th and 17th Century. It traded items like silk, ceramics and spices with China, Japan, Europe, India, and even Arabia.
Then due to certain changes, it sat dormant for 200 years, remaining unchanged, until recently discovered by tourists.
I interviewed Eric Kappeler, a Swiss-born sculptor living in Hội An.
I also get to see a display of Cham dancing, and visit Marble Mountain, where sculptors have made a vision of hell in the subterranean caves.

Hội An là cảng thương mại quan trọng nhất trong khu vực Đông Nam Á trong thế kỷ 16 và 17. Giao dịch mặt hàng như lụa, đồ gốm và các loại gia vị với Trung Quốc, Nhật Bản, Châu Âu, Ấn Độ, và thậm chí rập Xê-út.
Sau đó, do thay đổi nhất định, nó ngồi không hoạt động trong 200 năm, còn lại không thay đổi, cho đến gần đây mới phát hiện ra khách du lịch.
Tôi phỏng vấn Eric Kappeler, một nhà điêu khắc Thụy Sĩ sinh sống ở Hội An.
Tôi cũng nhận được để xem một màn hình hiển thị nhảy múa Chăm, và ghé thăm Ngũ Hành Sơn, nơi mà nhà điêu khắc đã thực hiện một tầm nhìn của địa ngục trong các hang động dưới lòng đất.

More information on Eric’s Sculptors – http://www.capellano.com/
Music – *Discovery Sound loops http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFXNmsXOJNk


Gardening Daily Tips No 135

 

Welcome to nghelamvuon.wordpress.com Gardening Daily Tips No 135

Hosta, Plantain Lily (Hosta x)

Plant type: Perennial

USDA Hardiness Zones: 4a to 9a

Height: 18″ to 24″

Spread: 36″ to 48″

Exposure: shade to partial shade partial sun

Bloom Color: Lavender

Bloom Time: Mid summer

Leaf Color: Green

Growth Rate: average

Moisture: moist

Soil Condition: Acidic, Clay, Loamy, Neutral, Sandy, Well drained

Form: Rounded

Landscape Uses:

Alpine garden, Border, Foundation, Ground cover, Massing, Seashore, Specimen, Woodland garden

Special Features:

Attractive foliage, Not North American native

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Q&A: Sucession Planting

Question: Can you give me some ideas of how to plant crops in succession? Which early crops can be followed by others that will have time to mature?

Answer: Early plantings of peas, lettuce, baby carrots, spinach, baby beets, and early bush beans, which are usually “done” by July if you plant in May or earlier, can be followed by subsequent plantings of the same crops (except for peas, which don’t like to germinate and grow in summer heat). Rotate the crops so that your second planting of root crops goes where the leafy greens had grown, and leaf crops where the fruiting (beans and peas) crops had been. Work some compost into the soil before planting the second round, as the first pass will have depleted nutrients with their quick spring growth. You can also start broccoli and kale in flats and transplant them to the midsummer garden for fall harvest. Summer planted seeds and transplants will need extra attention so they don’t dry out – use mulch to moderate soil temperatures and maintain moisture. Seeds may need the protection of a sheet of fabric or a board to keep the soil most enough for germination – just keep an eye on them and remove the cover as soon as seeds sprout. Enjoy the extended bounty!

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Q&A: Protecting Gardens and Dogs

Question: I care a lot about my garden and recently got a new dog. Is there anything I should do to protect them both?

Answer: Since dogs love to nibble on plants, avoid ones that are known to be irritating or toxic. Common garden plants that can harm your pets include flamingo lily (Anthurium), castor bean, foxglove, jasmine, oleander and tomato plants. Pet-friendly plants, on the other hand, include bamboo, catnip, lavender, and marigold (other than the marsh marigold). As for protecting your garden, the best way to curb the destructive garden tendencies of a dog is to let him burn off that exuberant energy in a nearby park. A well-exercised dog will use yard time to hang out with you and relax, not to dig up your plants.

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Q&A: Preventing Weeds From Growing in Marble Chips

Question: I have a small garden with white marble chip rocks separating the plants. Is there something I can be put down on the ground before laying the marble chips to prevent weeds from growing up between the rocks? I have heard that laying newspaper or plastic bags down will keep weeds from growing. Is this true?

Answer: Black plastic is not recommended around plants because it keeps both air and water from reaching into the soil. Newspaper or a layer of cardboard will work for a certain period of time to prevent weeds from germinating, but eventually it will rot away and need to be replaced. Some gardeners use a weed barrier fabric under gravel — it is specially made to be porous to water. While it will stop weeds from growing up through it, it will not stop seeds from germinating in the surface gravel.The gravel combined with bits of leaves and so on that work their way into the gravel make a perfect germination bed. The gravel can be raked periodically to disturb the seeds that land in it, or the area can be treated periodically with a pre-emergent herbicide such as corn gluten.

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Tip: Pick Lettuce Early

Research done by the USDA shows that the early bird gets not only the worm, but the best-tasting lettuce. Lettuce picked at 7 a.m. had almost twice the sugars as that harvested at 2 p.m. So get out of bed and get that lettuce!

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Tip: Protect Yourself From Insects and Sun

Keep insect repellent and sunscreen handy and use them every time you go into the garden. Wear a hat, too. It just makes sense to protect yourself from insects and the hot summer sun.

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 Gardening Tips Video:

Maishakselen Kasteel-Meeuwen BV Trekkerweb.nl

Uploaded by on Oct 4, 2009

Maishakselen Kasteel-Meeuwen BV
Filmpje van Loon- en Transportbedrijf Kasteel-Meeuwen van het maishakselen met de twee nieuwe New-Holland FR9060 hakselaars, met 8 rijige Kemper maisbek. Door het droge weer kan de vrachtwagen over het land rijden.

Category:

Autos & Vehicles

License:

Standard YouTube License

Vietnam Travel

Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), Vietnam Travel Video Guide

Uploaded by on Aug 22, 2010

I think the first thing that you notice about Ho Chi Minh City is the traffic, elbow to elbow, a constant drone of motorcycle motors and horns. In Saigon, I interviewed video artist, Tran Dan http://trandanvnartist.multiply.com/, asking him where he finds inspiration in such a bustling city.

Hồ Chí Minh (Sài Gòn), Hướng dẫn Du lịch Việt Nam Video

Tôi nghĩ rằng điều đầu tiên mà bạn thông báo về thành phố Hồ Chí Minh là giao thông, khuỷu tay đến khuỷu tay, một máy bay không người lái liên tục của động cơ xe gắn máy và sừng. Tại Sài Gòn, tôi phỏng vấn nghệ sĩ video, Trần http://trandanvnartist.multiply.com/ Dan, yêu cầu ông, nơi ông tìm thấy cảm hứng trong một thành phố nhộn nhịp như vậy.

Translation – Vu Khac Hao http://hao.blogtiengviet.net/
Music – *Discovery Sound loops http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFXNmsXOJNk
*Original composition by David Nicholson http://www.davidsmedia.com/Davidsmedia/Home.html
*Le Tuan Hung and Dang Kim Hien
http://www.move.com.au/disc.cfm/3199

Gardening Daily Tips No 134

Welcome to nghelamvuon.wordpress.com Gardening Daily Tips No 134


Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)

Plant type: Annual, Herb

USDA Hardiness Zones: UKN

Height: 12″ to 24″

Spread: 24″ to 30″

Exposure: partial shade partial sun to full sun

Bloom Color: Blue, Lavender, Pink, Purple, White

Bloom Time: Early summer, Early fall, Late summer, Mid summer

Leaf Color: Green, Silvery

Growth Rate: fast

Moisture: dry to moist

Soil Condition: Adaptable, Alkaline, Clay, Loamy, Neutral, Sandy, Well drained

Form: Upright or erect

Landscape Uses:

Border, Container, Foundation, Massing, Seashore, Specimen

Special Features:

Not North American native, Invasive, Naturalizing, Suitable for cut flowers, Suitable for dried flowers

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Q&A: Rose Pruning

Question: I’m new to growing roses this year. When and how often do I prune them, and am I suppose to cut the flowers when you bloom or leave them on the vine? Can you recommend a tool to use?

Answer: To remove the spent roses, or “deadhead”, simply cut back the flower stem to just above the first leaf with five leaflets. This will make the bush look neater and encourage it to rebloom sooner if it is a reblooming type of rose. Unfortunately, the answers to your question on pruning depend on which type of rose you have. There are different classes of roses and they are treated differently for pruning and for winter care. In addition, some roses bloom only once in spring and others cycle in and out of bloom all summer. Without knowing which variety you have, it is impossible to give you a specific answer. You might want to look at a good basic reference book on growing roses. Besides giving lots of general pointers, it will show you in illustrations how to prune. There are different schools of thought on just the right pruners, but I prefer the anvil type pruners. Some gardeners prefer the bypass type. Whichever you use, make sure they’re clean and sharp, and always cut at an angle so water will drain away from the cut. Good luck with your roses!

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Q&A: Deterring Crows

Question: Is there a way to prevent crows from pulling and eating sweet corn as soon as it emerges?

Answer: Continuous flagging is the most effective way to keep birds from crops such as corn. Stakes are placed 15 to 20 feet apart all around the corn patch and a long flag of cloth or shiny mylar is attached to the top. The flag can be tied directly or tied first to a string and the string attached to the stake (gives more play in the wind). Set up the stakes before the corn is attractive to the crows. Another method, frqeuently used for ripening fruit trees or small fruits, is bird netting.

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Q&A: Lilac Not Blooming

Question: Three years ago I bought a lilac bush. I can’t remember the name, but it has never bloomed. What am I doing wrong and when will it bloom?

Answer: This is a very common problem, one I have experienced myself. To be honest, I have seen very few lilacs that bloomed before their third season. However, here are a few bits of information and ideas to consider. The most common reason that lilacs don’t bloom is a lack of sunlight. They need full sun to flower well. Without sun, all you get are leaves! If the plant is shaded, you might consider moving it, or removing whatever is shading it, if that’s possible. Are you “feeding” your lilac? A good hefty addition of organic matter (compost, composted cow manure, leaf mould) would serve her well. You can also use a balanced, slow-release fertilizer. If your lilac doesn’t flower at all in the next couple of years, and you are really desperate, try root pruning the shrub. In late summer, dig one shovel’s depth deep around the drip line of the plant. This will sever some roots and maybe shock the plant into setting flower buds. But if the shrub isn’t blooming because it is weak or improperly planted, root pruning might weaken it further. Root pruning a young shrub really is a last resort. Good luck!

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Tip: Start Sweet Potato Slips

Go to the grocery store and choose your favorite color sweet potato. Pick one with a “hook” to help you determine which way is up or down. The hook end goes up. Stick toothpicks in the potato to suspend it in water over a quart jar and place it in a sunny location.Baby plantlets will grow from the potato. When they reach 3 to 5 inches long, remove the toothpicks and let the potato plunge deeper so the stems are under water. Roots will form on them. After roots form, pluck off the plantlets and plant them

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Tip: Stay Ahead of Weeds

Stay ahead of weed problems. Pulling is best, especially if you throw the residue of your labor into the compost pile. Water the bed before weeding — weeds will surrender more easily.

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 Gardening Tips Video:

Cosechadoras Autopropulsadas HORTECH – 2



Uploaded by on Oct 30, 2009

Cosechadoras de lechugas y hortalizas de hoja HORTECH Línea autopropulsada.

Mas información en http://www.globalfarms.cl

Category:

Science & Technology

Tags:

License:

Standard YouTube License

Vietnam Travel

Hue, Vietnam Travel Video Guide

Uploaded by on Oct 24, 2010

Hue was the ancient imperial city of the Nguyen Dynasty. I visit the Citadel which once contained the forbidden city, and take a dragon boat tour along the Perfume River to view the Thien Mu Pagoda and the Tombs of the Emperors. I meet up with Nhi, a commerce student who takes me to Thanh Toan Bridge where we meet a fortune teller. Nhi discusses superstition in Vietnam and we both get our palms read.

Huế là thành phố cổ đại hoàng đế của triều Nguyễn. Thăm quan Đại Nội một lần chứa các thành phố cấm, và có một tour du lịch thuyền rồng dọc theo sông Hương để xem chùa Thiên Mụ và các lăng mộ của Hoàng đế. Tôi đáp ứng với Nhi, một sinh viên thương mại người đưa tôi đến cầu Thanh Toàn, nơi chúng tôi gặp một thầy bói. Nhi thảo luận về mê tín dị đoan tại Việt Nam và cả hai chúng tôi có được lòng bàn tay của chúng tôi đã đọc.

Music – *Discovery Sound loops http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFXNmsXOJNk *Le Tuan Hung and Dang Kim Hien http://www.move.com.au/disc.cfm/3199

See more  


Gardening Daily Tips No 133

Welcome to nghelamvuon.wordpress.com Gardening Daily Tips No 133

Lilyturf (Liriope muscari)

Plant type: Perennial

USDA Hardiness Zones: 5a to 10a

Height: 6″ to 12″

Spread: 12″ to 36″

Exposure: shade to full sun

Bloom Color: Lavender

Bloom Time: Early summer, Early fall, Late summer, Mid summer

Leaf Color: Green, Variegated

Growth Rate: slow

Moisture: moist

Soil Condition: Acidic, Alkaline, Clay, Loamy, Neutral, Sandy, Well drained

Form: Rounded

Landscape Uses:

Border, Container, Ground cover, Massing, Rock garden, Seashore, Specimen, Woodland garden

Special Features:

Attractive foliage, Not North American native, Naturalizing, Suitable for cut flowers, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms

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Q&A: Get rid of Cucumber Beetles

Question: How can I prevent the beetles infested in my cucumber plants?

Answer: Cucumber beetles are truly a pest. It’s easier to keep them away early in the season than get rid of them once they entrench. As far as I know, there are cucumber varieties that are resistant to bacterial wilt, which the beetles transmit, but none resistent to the beetles themselves. Here are some suggestions: keep weeds in control early in the season, as the adults feed on pollen from weed seeds before cucumber plants emerge. Rotate your crops so that you there’s at least a three-year interval between planting vine crops in the same location. Cover your plants with summer-weight fabric row covers early in the summer to prevent beetles from reaching them. Most cucmbers need pollination by insects in order to bear fruit, so you’ll need to pull back the cover when the plants blossom to allow bees in. Alternately, you can hand-pollinate the blossoms. Knock, shake, or hand pick beetles off plants and out of flowers, and clean up garden debris in the fall to reduce the number of overwintering adults. When the plants outgrow the cover, if the adults beetles are still a problem, dust plants and flowers with insecticides containing pyrethrum, following package instructions. Good luck!

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Q&A: Onions Tend to Rot

Question: Last year my onions grew well in the garden, but when I harvested them, many were mushy and rotting inside. The ones in storage are also rotting. I followed the correct drying procedures. What went wrong?

Answer: Your onions probably had bacterial neck rot. The bacteria enter the neck of the onions through wounds made during growing, harvesting and curing. Unfortunately, there isn’t much you can do once your onions have the disease, but you can prevent neck rot in future crops. Avoid using mulch and take care not to wound the tops while cultivating. When selecting varieties avoid white and thick-necked varieties such as ‘Sweet Spanish’, which are more susceptible to the disease. To harvest and cure onions properly, wait until 75% of the tops have fallen over naturally, gently dig/pull all the onions, and store them in a dry, shady place with good ventilation, such as an outdoor shed or barn, for 10 days to two weeks. After the onions have cured, put them in slatted crates or mesh bags and store them indoors in a cellar with low humidity and temperatures between 33F and 45F.

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Q&A: Leaving Clippings on Lawn

Question: I just moved to a place with beaufitul, lush lawn. To keep it thick and growing well, should I rake the clippings or leave the clippings on the lawn? I do not know what species of grass it is.

Answer: If you have a mulching blade on your mower, mow frequently, or don’t mind going over your lawn twice, you can safely leave the clippings on the lawn. The trick is to make sure the clippings are small. If you try to mow down two or more inches of grass blades, they will clump up and take a very long time to decompose. So, as long as you mow regularly, you’ll be doing your lawn a favor by leaving the clippings on. As the small pieces decompose they will return nitrogen to the roots of the grass plants. Otherwise, you can rake them off and compost the clippings, or use them to mulch your garden.

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Tip: Plant Spring Radishes

One thing just about all radishes need is cool weather. Spring radishes planted too late into the summer are likely to be very pungent. They may also form only small roots or may fail to bulb up at all. For planting after the spring days are routinely above 65 or 70 degrees, choose a variety such as ‘Cherry Bomb’, which is highly heat-resistant.

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Tip: Plant in Raised Beds

Planting in raised beds offers many benefits. Drainage is improved; the soil warms up faster in spring; you can focus your soil-building efforts in the growing area; compaction is minimized since you don’t walk in the beds; and the amount of bending is reduced; among others.

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La nueva industria de produccion de tomates en invernadero


Uploaded by on Jan 27, 2011

La empresa transnacional MONSANTO vendió semilla contaminada de tomate a productores guatemaltecos, provocando pérdida de cultivos y pérdidas por Q.25 millones. No obstante las pruebas de laboratorio que certifican la contaminación con bacterias de la semilla, la transnacional no asume su responsabilidad y menos el resarcimiento de los productores. El MAGA no defiende los intereses nacionales sino los de MONSANTO.

Category:

News & Politics

Tags:

License:

Standard YouTube License

Vietnam Travel

Hội An, Vietnam Travel Video Guide

Uploaded by on Oct 21, 2010

Hội An was the most important trading port in South East Asia in the 16th and 17th Century. It traded items like silk, ceramics and spices with China, Japan, Europe, India, and even Arabia.
Then due to certain changes, it sat dormant for 200 years, remaining unchanged, until recently discovered by tourists.
I interviewed Eric Kappeler, a Swiss-born sculptor living in Hội An.
I also get to see a display of Cham dancing, and visit Marble Mountain, where sculptors have made a vision of hell in the subterranean caves.

Hội An là cảng thương mại quan trọng nhất trong khu vực Đông Nam Á trong thế kỷ 16 và 17. Giao dịch mặt hàng như lụa, đồ gốm và các loại gia vị với Trung Quốc, Nhật Bản, Châu Âu, Ấn Độ, và thậm chí rập Xê-út.
Sau đó, do thay đổi nhất định, nó ngồi không hoạt động trong 200 năm, còn lại không thay đổi, cho đến gần đây mới phát hiện ra khách du lịch.
Tôi phỏng vấn Eric Kappeler, một nhà điêu khắc Thụy Sĩ sinh sống ở Hội An.
Tôi cũng nhận được để xem một màn hình hiển thị nhảy múa Chăm, và ghé thăm Ngũ Hành Sơn, nơi mà nhà điêu khắc đã thực hiện một tầm nhìn của địa ngục trong các hang động dưới lòng đất.

More information on Eric’s Sculptors – http://www.capellano.com/
Music – *Discovery Sound loops http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFXNmsXOJNk